Questions from our webinar on writing the Results & Discussion sections by Anup Vasudev — R Voice

Questions from our webinar on writing the Results & Discussion sections by Anup Vasudev

Kakoli Majumder
Kakoli Majumder Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 204 admin
edited November 17 in Publication Support

Last week's webinar from the Academic Writing Month Webinar Series "Your findings are fabulous: How to present your Results and Discussion" by @Anup Vasudev was an informative and insightful session. In this webinar, Anup explained how to organize your research findings and present them in the best possible manner through your Results section. He also provided excellent strategies to showcase your findings effectively in the Discussion section.

A big thank you to all those who attended the session live. Unfortunately, Anup could not take all the questions during the session as we were running out of time. As promised during the session, we will share the answers to the rest of the questions here:

  1. What do you mean exactly by saying in don't repeat results? Because if we gave result and in the discussion session we have to discuss them, we have to repeat it? Is it bad?
  2. When we compare our work with previous literature, how recent must the study be?
  3. My sentences usually get too wordy, so how do you de-clutter it. Any examples would be great.
  4. The difficult part is to not repeating results in discussion. Could you give more (detail) tips about it?
  5. How do we connect our theoretical framework in the discussion of our findings How de we actually signal this in our writing?


Comments

  • Kakoli Majumder
    Kakoli Majumder Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 204 admin

    @Yufita Chinta @Abhishek Shukla @Rolan AmbrocioTagging you as you might have asked some of these questions.

  • Anup Vasudev
    Anup Vasudev Member Posts: 6 ✭✭
    edited November 16

    Hello everybody, thank you so much for attending the webinar! It was truly a pleasure to be a part of this webinar; my most sincere gratitude goes out to @Kakoli Majumder, who has been incredibly supportive to me through the course of this webinar and has been instrumental in making such aspects of scientific research accessible to the scientific community.

    I did receive several questions after the session; I will answer each of them in the comments that follow. Please do not hesitate to reply to these comments for further follow-up comments/queries. Have a great day!

  • Anup Vasudev
    Anup Vasudev Member Posts: 6 ✭✭
    edited November 17

    1. What do you mean exactly by saying in don't repeat results? Because if we gave result and in the discussion session we have to discuss them, we have to repeat it? Is it bad?

    A: Of course, it is not possible to ‘ignore’ the results in the discussion. By saying ‘don’t repeat the results in your discussion’, I wish to imply that one must avoid providing extensive details regarding the results (citations to figures/tables, numerical data and statistical significance). State, in about one or two lines, the result you wish to indicate and move on to interpret/explain this finding (both what it means and how it fits within the content of findings from relevant previous studies).

  • Anup Vasudev
    Anup Vasudev Member Posts: 6 ✭✭

    2. When we compare our work with previous literature, how recent must the study be?

    A: As recent as possible. Of course, there are no limitations regarding this; one is pretty much free to choose studies that fit the context of the current work, but the more recent they are, the better, because often, citations that are older (for e.g., 1970s–2000) have usually been updated or rendered as obsolete because they may have been refuted in future work. Hence, it is always advisable to choose studies after, for e.g., 2005 or 2006, but I must stress that this is not a mandatory rule and older citations mustn’t be ignored; the context is very important in each case. It’s best to read as many citations as possible while choosing which ones to cite. This way, you can be sure that the citation are dependable and will serve as useful reference points for your current study’s findings.

  • Anup Vasudev
    Anup Vasudev Member Posts: 6 ✭✭

    3: My sentences usually get too wordy, so how do you de-clutter it. Any examples would be great. p.s I haven't attended the first session 😅 (Question by @Abhishek Shukla)

    A: Thank you for your question, Abhishek! The easiest way is to split sentences into multiple parts and filtering out data that aren’t important given the major focus of your study. Another very nice way to do so is include the data (especially in case of the results or methods) as a table or figure. For e.g., when you’re talking about primers used, instead of stating the primer sequences and names as sentences, which would be really long, it’s always best to say something like: “Details regarding the primers used are presented in Table 1.” Here is another example: Instead of stating multiple steps that were followed while explaining the principle of a method, insert a ‘flowchart figure’ and say: “A flowchart depicting the principle of this study is presented in Figure 1.”

  • Anup Vasudev
    Anup Vasudev Member Posts: 6 ✭✭

    4: The difficult part is to not repeating results in discussion. Could you give more (detail) tips about it? (Question by @Yufita Chinta)

    A: Thank you for your question, Yufita! It is not obviously possible to ‘ignore’ the results in the discussion. I recommend avoiding providing extensive details regarding the results (citations to figures/tables, numerical data and statistical significance). State, in about one or two lines, the result you wish to indicate and move on to interpret/explain this finding (both what it means and how it fits within the content of findings from relevant previous studies). For e.g.: “In this study, mice treated with XYZ showed higher body weight changes than the control mice, indicating that ….”

  • Anup Vasudev
    Anup Vasudev Member Posts: 6 ✭✭

    5: How do we connect our theoretical framework in the discussion of our findings How de we actually signal this in our writing? (Question by @Rolan Ambrocio)

    A: Thank you for your question, Rolan! The best way to do this is directly, i.e., state the said result you wish to discuss explicitly and interpret it, along with the necessary citations. Do this for all results, and before the conclusion, ensure that your interpretations of your findings clearly answer the question(s) being asked in the introduction. Another tip that helps set the study’s theoretical framework is stating, in brief, what problem the current study attempts to solve/addresses and whether or not it does so. Adding the novelty of your study also helps (what makes your study special with regard to the relevant field of research). These steps will help ensure that you have always focused on the importance of your study.