Quick! Update your CV before you forget that awesome thing you recently accomplished β€” R Voice

Quick! Update your CV before you forget that awesome thing you recently accomplished

Andrea Hayward
Andrea Hayward Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 573 admin
edited July 19 in Everything & Anything

Full disclosure: I can't take credit for this brilliant discussion title. I got it from this tweet I came across, which is my inspiration for this discussion πŸ˜ƒ

We're all constantly working hard and accomplishing new things (even though we often forget to give ourselves credit). Because of the hyper-competitive academic environment, it almost always seems like someone else is doing better and doing MORE. So it's easy to lose sight of our own efforts, achievements, and accomplishments. But it shouldn't be like this πŸ˜•

Since we barely spend any time thinking about a success or achievement, and immediately move to the next thing on our lists, the odds of us remembering to add that achievement onto our CVs is also slim. And then when we have to actually use the CV to apply for something, we're running around and looking through months-worth of emails, trying to remember what we've been working on and what we achieved (I see you nodding...πŸ‘€)

To avoid this from happening in the future (or at least lessen how often it happens), I'm starting this thread with a dual purpose.

  1. Remember to update your CV with the cool thing you recently accomplished -- could be anything that you'd like to add to your CV.
  2. If you're feeling a little extra generous, tell us what the achievement is and let us celebrate with you! 🀩
Tagged:

Comments

  • Yufita Chinta
    Yufita Chinta Member Posts: 125 ✭✭✭✭

    ow ow ow, @Andrea Hayward

    This thread just lands in the right time. I have another publication recently. I think I need to proudly insert it on my achievement list before, as you mentioned, panicking myself on building my CV up during the job hunting 😁

    In term of publication as achievement, I always forget to list up papers with my name as a co-author. I mostly feel not excited as much as if I am the first author. Well, I don't mean to not appreciate the work. But, the less excitement maybe lead me to the 'forgetting action'. Need to change this attitude soon 😢

  • chris leonard
    chris leonard Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 145 admin

    There is also a well-known psychological benefit to writing your CV in that it reminds you of your achievements. So it's doubly worth doing!

  • Shruti Turner
    Shruti Turner Member Posts: 342 ✭✭✭✭

    This is such an important post, and probably timely for most people reading - thank you @Andrea Hayward ! I find writing my CV so difficult, let alone at crunch time when somebody asks for it! I find that I don't get any psychological benefit from the rush and panic, but taking the time to craft a CV really does give a positive boost as @chris leonard mentions.

    For me, I guess my latest achievement is finishing my PhD - it feels good to be able to update my CV to not have the date pending anymore!

    A few tips that have helped me with my CV crafting:-

    • Format bullet points as "I achieved X by doing Y as measured by Z" - stolen from a Google workshop I attended, but really powerful. It helps focus on the achievements rather than descriptions of work and also has helped me work out what is important in my CV...if I haven't achieved anything, does it need to be there?
    • I keep a comprehensive list of all my achievements on my LinkedIn profile. I try to keep it as up to date as possible, so when I need a tailored CV I can grab what I need off there. I was once told that a CV needs to be unique to each, but your LinkedIn is a catch all.
    • I keep every CV that I've written in a Google Drive folder. They're named by what I was applying for so that I can update a similar one when needed, or I can pull together the parts I need for a new CV. I found I took a long time to find a CV format that I like and did the job, now I've got it I don't want to keep recreating it from scratch...this method helps with that too!
  • Andrea Hayward
    Andrea Hayward Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 573 admin

    Congratulations on the recent publication @Yufita Chinta! 🀩 I'd say let's celebrate but we already had a lovely pizza party over the weekend πŸ˜‰

    Hoping that this makes its way to your CV soon. I understand that listing a paper in which you're a coauthor versus the first author might not be as exciting, but look at it this way -- your name has made its way to the paper because you've worked hard on some aspect of the research project and/or paper. You've put in the time and the effort and your name rightfully deserves to be there...just as the paper deserves to be listed on your CV. Still an achievement. Still a success! πŸ’―

  • Andrea Hayward
    Andrea Hayward Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 573 admin

    @Shruti Turner at the risk of sounding repetitive...Congratulations Dr. Turner! 🀩 #PhDone

    Thanks for sharing such great CV writing tips! I agree with what you've said about LinkedIn being a space where you can store all your achievements and then draw from there when you need to update your CV for a specific job application. Plus, having an updated LinkedIn profile also has its benefits, so really it's a dual purpose

  • Raj sundaram
    Raj sundaram Member Posts: 322 ✭✭✭✭

    I update/take stock of my CV and LinkedIn profile once in 6 months ish. To update papers/conference presentations and other outputs. Outputs that are supposedly "worthy" for the external world. Started doing it more recently. In addition to the CV - I put some effort in trying to maintain my Publons account and ORCID - to keep tabs on peer-reviews I do. This is for the external world rather than for myself.

    This is because from experience and observation, I have learnt to take my CV and that of others with a pinch of salt, putting things in perspective. In my specific circumstances, my career (and life in general) can be best described as turbulent. I have had spells with no accomplishments and achievements, and just a lot of failure. Failing on an everyday basis for years - feeling and being treated as incompetent. Have had experiences of resources willfully withheld, obstacles put on the way etc., that derailed me as a researcher and a human, which only made things worse for life. Having the strength of character to survive and stay in the field doesnt really go into the CV. πŸ˜‰Also a lot of things like finance/people management, research planning, all the paperwork to ensure safety, etc. doesnt go into the CV - not always.

    From a personal viewpoint, to take stock (and for other reasons, including as a record for any future purposes) and to celebrate small everyday achievements, I write a work journal. Summarizing my goals, intention, effort, what went well, what went wrong, why, how much of it is my responsibility, where should I exercise wisdom of what can and cant be changed, etc.

    Some day, when I become a big-enough-name...hope to write a long-form CV where I can put everything that didnt work. πŸ˜‚https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/apr/30/cv-of-failures-princeton-professor-publishes-resume-of-his-career-lows

    Recent success: After getting a more stable position last year here in Japan (after a long struggle), glad I will climb up the career ladder one more time. Happier (with tinges of sadness) that I will move out of JapanπŸ™‚.

  • Raj sundaram
    Raj sundaram Member Posts: 322 ✭✭✭✭

    Congrats, @Shruti Turner and @Yufita Chinta on your achievements....πŸ‘

  • Shruti Turner
    Shruti Turner Member Posts: 342 ✭✭✭✭

    Oh my gosh - I can't believe I just totally missed your comment on the thread @Yufita Chinta!! Congratulations on your latest publication :) Must be a great feeling! I think it's totally natural to feel more pride in first author papers, even when we know that the co-authored ones are achievements too.

  • Shruti Turner
    Shruti Turner Member Posts: 342 ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you both, @Andrea Hayward and @Raj sundaram for your wishes ❀️

  • Shruti Turner
    Shruti Turner Member Posts: 342 ✭✭✭✭

    Firstly, congratulations @Raj sundaram on climbing up to the next rung of your career!! Are you comfortable sharing where you will be moving to next?

    I love that you've pointed out about not just CV updates but also the other "social media" or professional accounts that we have. I admire the discipline you have to set aside the time every 6 months as routine. I'm a "do it when it happens or it'll never happen" type of person when it comes to these things. Probably not the most efficient use of my time, but I guess different methods work for different people.

    I find it interesting that you write a work journal - I have never thought about doing this. I think because I have never managed to keep a personal journal going before. The closet I have got is writing a blog, documenting my PhD journey, it's totally honest about the emotions and day to day of what I've been doing and easy to break down into chunks. I feel also, because it is open to the public, that it makes me think about how I want to write things in a way that is balanced, which in turn has helped measure my approach whilst documenting achievements/low points etc. Whilst I didn't write it for other people, the hope was that it may help others if they came across it, and I have found it immensely beneficial.

  • Raj sundaram
    Raj sundaram Member Posts: 322 ✭✭✭✭

    @Shruti Turner ..I understand your thoughtprocess with using a blog to document.

    I used to have a blog. But I felt, I was not being 100% authentic exactly because there was a possibility that other people may view it. I was massaging the content a lot - mostly involving depersonalizing - for a lot of reasons. Mainly because I could not DIRECTLY share my experiences without risking recriminations - more than what I was already facing. (I still cant - even now, I only imply....)

    So, I had to really work hard on how to word things in a way that wouldnt lead to more problems for me. It was terrible because I was in a very bad state healthwise in a foreign country alone (ostracized, at the lowest rung of the power dynamic, basically left alone to die amidst what I now recognize as power abuse and gaslighting...). I started the blog with the intent of talking about workplace dynamics in academia.

    [A similar experience of ostracism repeated in Japan (in a different life aspect)....but have survived and turned things around and am getting out as a respected human, friend, community member, researcher, etc. So, glad - its the right time for me to move...]

    I dont know if the blog really helped people. It might have as some people wrote to me saying that they were glad someone was writing about it. But I stopped because it was really weighting on me that while I was being accurate about the content, I was not being authentic. I also felt ashamed that I was inauthentic because of fear. In hindsight fear was a natural and the right response, that actually helped my survival. Otherwise, I might not have emerged even in the tatters that I emerged that took years to mend (only to get tattered again and to remend.) Also, the hardwork and the emotions that went behind the screen while writing the blog stemming from my experiences were wearing me down even more. For me, it was the right thing to stop and delete the blog - it had served its purpose, I would like to think.

    Thanks for the wishes. The next position - will share once I make the move...I am yet to officially resign from the current position. πŸ™‚

  • Raj sundaram
    Raj sundaram Member Posts: 322 ✭✭✭✭

    Oh...the "6 months" timeline serves as my motivation to get things going for the next six months. Also works for in my case - because it helps me take stock about the direction as I watch external achievements collect or not collect. Its a decent time-frame to put things in perspective , see if I am doing alright, re-evaluate my direction/goals and see the big picture. So - yeah, for me, it works. πŸ™‚

  • Yufita Chinta
    Yufita Chinta Member Posts: 125 ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you for congratulating my recent achievement @Andrea Hayward , @Raj sundaram , @Shruti Turner

    I follow your discussion here and get learnt many things about recording achievement. I love how @Shruti Turner uses technology (LinkedIn and GoogleDrive) to update your CVs and how you name each CV based on the purpose to what application it goes to. I will adopt the naming strategy.

    First, congratulation @Raj sundaram on your career step up. I also agree to wow how discipline you to periodically (6 month ish) update your CVs. The most from Raj's sharing is the work journal. It sounds very practical and powerful to keep the mental condition, either in a good or standard or bad situation/achievement. I will try to have my work journal too.

    I can feel Raj's intension about blog that blog sometimes cannot become an appropriate media to express my feelings and experiences. But I also can understand Shruti's point on how informative and benefit blog for others, who have the same issues. I share my detail experiences of marrying a Japanese: the official martial laws in each country and international, the religious martial laws since we have different religious, the culture that was totally different, etc. I didn't know before that the articles are red by 5 couples of Indonesian-Japanese who have been successfully married then 😍 hmmmm...sorry, I can't find a great conclusion here πŸ˜…

  • Shruti Turner
    Shruti Turner Member Posts: 342 ✭✭✭✭

    That makes total sense about the blog, @Raj sundaram - if reporting difficult circumstances I can not imagine the pressure to make sure it is written just so. You show such strength to have been through the experiences you have faced, and I admire you so much that you have learned to take it in your stride and used it to help other people too.

    I feel your blog must have helped at least those people that messaged you - I find people are more likely to send messages of complaint than praise if they message at all!!

    I'm looking forward to hearing about your next steps when you're able to share :)

  • Shruti Turner
    Shruti Turner Member Posts: 342 ✭✭✭✭

    I think you highlight a really important point in your post @Yufita Chinta - different things work for different people and different purposes! I feel there is no right or wrong in supporting others and sharing our experiences, providing it is safe and just that supportive (obviously there are many wrong ways of trying to support others that don't quite do the job!). The idea that we can find positive and realistic experiences about situations we are in, is really important at any age. Here is the UK there was a scheme/campaign called "People like me" which tried to diversify job roles/leadership so that everyone had someone they could relate to as inspiration.

    PS I hope the CV naming convention helps you as much as it helps me!

  • Andrea Hayward
    Andrea Hayward Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 573 admin

    @Raj sundaram Congratulations on moving up to the next step on your career ladder!

    I think it's very important that you brought up the topic of failure and how it's much MUCH different in academia. Failure and rejection (sometimes, on a daily basis) are not uncommon experiences in academia; although I really wish they were. This realization struck me with all it's gory truth and bitterness when I worked on the CACTUS Mental Health Survey and got to hear from so many researchers across the globe. For researchers, there seems to be failure at every corner - be it with experiments, securing funding, getting published, getting a stable role, getting tenure, the list goes on. And where anyone else in the corporate world would drop this kind of work for something that has more immediate rewards, researchers continue to persist and prevail, which is admirable and inspiring within itself. I know it's not the focus of this discussion but I feel like this needs to be talked about much more, is deserving of a boatload of credit, and something the academic CV should be considerate of.

    I also find it very interesting that you've rightly mentioned that certain important skills like people management, budgeting, etc. don't always make their way to an academic CV. Although, I'm sure that the absence of these skills would be immediately noticed...sigh, the irony πŸ˜ͺ

  • Raj sundaram
    Raj sundaram Member Posts: 322 ✭✭✭✭

    Thanks, @Shruti Turner and @Yufita Chinta.

    Hehehe...good to see that we've all had experience with blogging with different viewpoints but tied by a common emotion to contribute....and to put information out there that might be helpful to others. πŸ™‚

  • Raj sundaram
    Raj sundaram Member Posts: 322 ✭✭✭✭

    Hehe... Have gotten used to failure. It used to bother me really badly, not any more...because I think with experience we all come to an understanding of the what is within one's control and factors out of control, both of which affect outcomes. In academia and research as a system and concept...there are lots of blackbox areas. There's in reality very little effort-outcome parity. A lot of it is just dumb luck and the Matthew effect. I say this for both successes and failures ...my own and others. So...as mentioned before, I take everything with a tablespoon full of salt.

    Given the competitiveness, many are set up to fail. Still, academia sells the myth of "if you work hard, are passionate, are smart and intelligent, you'll succeed". It's like the myth of the American dream. πŸ˜‚

    Everyone in academia is intelligent, smart, works hard, makes sacrifices...and not everyone succeeds. It's like winning a beauty pageant or getting cast as the lead in a Hollywood movie.

    I also find it very interesting that you've rightly mentioned that certain important skills like people management, budgeting, etc. don't always make their way to an academic CV. Although, I'm sure that the absence of these skills would be immediately noticed

    Not really, no. It's not noticed. Even if it is noticed, nothing is done about it. That's why academia...especially university-based academia is rife with bad leadership. πŸ™„